Top Ten Frailty Priorities

Research and knowledge mobilization are vital to finding better ways to improve the health and quality of life for people living with frailty. Canadian Frailty Network established a group (the Canadian Frailty Priority Setting Partnership) to undertake a study aimed at identifying priority areas for Canadian researchers, knowledge users and and funding organizations.

The Partnership followed the methods of the James Lind Alliance. It asked Canadians affected by older adults living with frailty – either personally, as a family member or caregiver, or through their work – for their unanswered questions about living with frailty, and care, support and treatment for older adults living with frailty.

Here are the results:

  1. How can health systems be organized to provide integrated/coordinated care that would better meet the health and social care needs of older adults living with frailty, and their family/caregivers?
  2. How can care, services and treatments be tailored to meet the needs of older adults living with frailty who are isolated and/or without family/caregiver support or advocates? 
  3. What is the impact of community- and home-based services, programs and resources in preventing and managing frailty (including slowing progression and/or minimizing the impact of frailty)?
  4. What are the costs and benefits of alternative models of housing, including multigenerational or shared living, for older adults living with frailty?
  5. What would help avoid unnecessary hospitalizations and emergency department visits for older adults living with frailty?
  6. What frailty-related attitudes, skills and knowledge should health and social care providers have? What are effective ways of improving attitudes and providing skills and knowledge about frailty for health and social care providers?
  7. What would help older adults living with frailty and their family/caregivers recognize when living at home is no longer viable?
  8. What are effective ways of supporting family/caregivers of older adults living with frailty to maintain their own health and wellbeing and/or that of older adults living with frailty?
  9. How can frailty measures be used by health care practitioners, older adults and family/caregivers to inform treatment and care decisions?
  10. What is the impact of exercise and physical activity (including type, duration and intensity) in preventing and managing frailty (including slowing progression and/or minimizing the impact of frailty)?