Recently published papers

Theou O, Jayanama K, Fernández-Garrido J, Buigues C, Pruimboom L, Hoogland AJ, Navarro-Martínez R, Rockwood K, Cauli O. Can a Prebiotic Formulation Reduce Frailty Levels in Older People? J Frailty Aging 2018;8(1):48-52

Van Scoy LJ, Day AG, Howard M, Sudore RL, Heyland DKAdaptation and Preliminary Validation of the Advance Care Planning Engagement Survey for Surrogate Decision Makers. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2019.01.008

Cho N, Boland L, McIsaac DI. The association of female sex with application of evidence-based practice recommendations for perioperative care in hip fracture surgery

Kim DH, Afilalo J, Shi SM. Evaluation of Changes in Functional Status in the Year After Aortic Valve Replacement. JAMA Intern Med. February 4, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6738

Campitelli MA, Maxwell CJ, Maclagan LC, Ko DT, Bell CM, Jeffs, L, Morris AM, Lapane KL, Daneman N, Bronskill SE. One-year survival and admission to hospital for cardiovascular events among older residents of long-term care facilities who were prescribed intensive- and moderate-dose statins

Abstract: Statins are used widely in older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities (LTC). In Ontario, over one-third of all residents of LTC are statin users, including 28% of frail residents who have a limited likelihood of 1-year survival; nearly one-quarter of users received high doses. Historically, however, randomized clinical trials studying the efficacy and safety of statins rarely include adults aged 75 years and older, and most have not included LTC residents. This leaves clinicians with little guidance when making ongoing decisions about treatment with statins, such as the appropriate dosing. This study sought to examine the rates of 1-year survival and admission to hospital for cardiovascular events among older LTC residents who were prescribed intensive-dose statins compared with those receiving moderate-dose statins. A retrospective cohort study using population-based administrative data from Ontario identified 21 808 residents in LTC who were 76 years of age and older and were prevalent statin users, and categorized residents as intensive- or moderate-dose users. The rates of mortality and admission to hospital for cardiovascular events at 1 year were similar between LTC residents taking intensive-dose statins compared with those taking moderate-dose statins. This lack of benefit should be considered when prescribing statins to vulnerable LTC residents who are at potentially increased risk of statin-related adverse events.

Click here to learn more about this CFN-funded research.

Heckman GA, Hirdes JP, Hébert PC, Morinville A, Amaral ACKB, Costa A, McKelvie RS. Predicting Future Health Transitions Among Newly Admitted Nursing Home Residents With Heart Failure. JAMDA 2018 12 17 online (in press). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2018.10.031

Abstract: To understand how a heart failure diagnosis and admission health instability predict health transitions and outcomes among newly admitted nursing home residents, a retrospective cohort study of linked administrative data was conducted involving older adults, aged 65 years and above, admitted to nursing homes in Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia, Canada, from 2010 to 2016. The final sample included 143,067 residents. Adverse events were most common in the first 90 days. A diagnosis of heart failure predicted worsening health instability, hospitalizations, and mortality. The magnitude of the impact of a heart failure diagnosis was greatest for lower baseline health instability. Residents with the highest degree of health instability were also most likely to die in hospital. A diagnosis of heart failure and health instability provide complementary information to predict transfers, deaths, and adverse outcomes. Clearly identifying these at-risk patients may be useful in targeting interventions in nursing homes.

Click here to learn more about this CFN-funded research.

Barclay R, Webber S, Ripat J, Grant T, Jones C. A, Lix L M., Mayo N, van Ineveld C, Salbach N MSafety and feasibility of an interactive workshop and facilitated outdoor walking group compared to a workshop alone in increasing outdoor walking activity among older adults: a pilot randomized controlled trial. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-018-0367-4

Constantinescu A, Li H, Yu J, Hoggard C, Holroyd-Leduc JExploring Rural Family Physicians’ Challenges in Providing Dementia Care: A Qualitative Study.  Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(4), 390-399. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0714980818000417.

Dupuis-Blanchard S, Gould O. Nursing Homes Without Walls for Aging in PlaceCanadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(4), 442-449. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0714980818000272

Konietzny C, Kaasalainen S, Dal-Bello Haas V, Merla C, Te A, Di Sante E, . . . Hadjistavropoulos, T. (2018). Muscled by the System: Informal Caregivers’ Experiences of Transitioning an Older Adult into Long-term Care. Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(4), 464-473. doi:10.1017/S0714980818000429

Rockwood K, Howlett SE. Fifteen years of progress in understanding frailty and health in aging. BMC Medicine201816:220. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1223-3

Giguère A, Farmanova E, Holroyd-Leduc JM, Straus SE, Urquhart R, Carnovale V, Breton E, Guo S, Maharaj N, Durand PJ, Légaré F, Turgeon AF, Aubin M. Key stakeholders’ views on the quality of care and services avilable to frail seniors in Canada. BMC Geriatrics 2018 18:290. BMC Geriatrics201818:290. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-018-0969-y

Abstract: Frail seniors often receive ineffective care, which does not meet their needs. It is still unclear how healthcare systems should be redesigned to be more sensitive to the needs and values of frail seniors and their caregivers. We thus aimed to describe key stakeholders’ perspectives on the current healthcare and services available to frail seniors. Our findings suggest redesigning assessment, communication with frail seniors and their caregivers, targeting care and services to the needs, and integrating care better across settings and in time. A systematic identification of frail older people is the first step to adapt healthcare systems to this population’s needs. Participation of frail older people and their caregivers to decision making would also allow choosing care plans meeting their care goals. The integration of care and services across settings, over time, and with various providers, is also needed to meet frail senior needs.

Kortes-Miller K, Boulé J, Wilson K & Stinchcombe A.(2018) Dying in Long-Term Care: Perspectives from Sexual and Gender Minority Older Adults about Their Fears and Hopes for End of Life, Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care, DOI: 10.1080/15524256.2018.1487364

Maxwell CJ, Campitelli MA, Diong C, Mondor L, Hogan DB, Amuah JE, Leslie S, Seitz D, Gill S, Thavorn K, Wodchis WP, Gruneir A, Teare G, Bronskill SE.  Variation in the health outcomes associated with frailty among home care clients: relevance of caregiver distress and client sex. BMC Geriatr. 2018; 18:211. Epub 2018 Sep 12.